Evidence-based Practices & Current Research

National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorder Evidence-Based Practices (2014)
In 2014, the National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorder released a new research review, entitled, “Evidence-based Practices for Children, Youth, and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder.” This comprehensive review extends the time-frame of the NPDC’s previous literature review, includes a more rigorous review process, and incorporates updated research (2007 - 2011).


National Autism Center: National Standards Project Phase 1 (2009) & Phase 2 (2015)
The primary goal of the National Standards Project is to provide critical information about which treatments have been shown to be effective for individuals with ASD. The original project, now referred to as Phase 1, examined and quantified the level of research supporting interventions that target the core characteristics of ASD in children, adolescents, and young adults (below 22 years of age) on the autism spectrum. Phase 2 was released early in 2015 to further extend this research review.


Maine Department of Health and Human Services & Maine Department of Education
In response to a growing need for information on evidence-based treatments for ASD, the Maine Department of Education and the Maine Department of Health and Human Services led a partnership of stakeholders in a systematic review of the latest research on treatment for ASD. The purpose of this work was to systematically review the research literature for treatment in ASD and to determine the levels of empirical evidence for treatments commonly used for children with ASD.


New Zealand Autism Spectrum Disorder Guideline (2008)
This guideline is intended to provide information and direction on autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in both children and adults in New Zealand. The guideline is an evidence-based summary that covers the identification and diagnosis of ASD, and ongoing assessment and access to interventions and services for individuals with ASD. It sought to provide the best evidence available at the time of publictaion to assist informed decision-making to improve the health, educational, and social outcomes for individuals with ASD. The guideline was developed to assist primary care practitioners, education professionals, policy makers, funding agencies, parents, caregivers and any others who support individuals with ASD in New Zealand.